Featured

Practicing, Some Practice Advice (Part 1) — by Michael Haber

I've written this brief essay for purely selfish reasons: I like to see my students improve. When they do, I feel happy, they feel happy, I go home for dinner a happy man. What follows is intended to help you organize your practicing, and your thinking about your practicing, in an effective way. Your progress, mine too, depends on the quality and quantity of this work. It's also intended to encourage you to practice, period. Not all of my students are always inclined to work as well and as much as they should. I should confess from the beginning that I have always loved practicing. It is the royal road to instrumental mastery and the incomparable satisfaction of playing music as well as it deserves to be played. I have [...]

The Fall 2017 CelloChat Schedule is Here!

  Hello CelloBello Followers! We're excited to announce our Fall 2017 CelloChat lineup. Join us starting October 1st via Facebook Live on the CelloBello Facebook page. All Chats take place at 8 PM ET unless otherwise noted. Stay tuned for updates!   October 1 & 8 NORMAN FISCHER The Shepherd School of Music at Rice University October 15 PAUL KATZ New England Conservatory  October 22 ASTRID SCHWEEN Juilliard Quartet, The Juilliard School October 29 GREGORY BEAVER Chiara Quartet, University of Nebraska-Lincoln November 5 ASTRID SCHWEEN Juilliard Quartet, The Juilliard School November 12 JEFFREY ZEIGLER Mannes College at The New School November 19 YEESUN KIM Borromeo String Quartet, New England Conservatory December 3 LAURENCE LESSER New England Conservatory  December 10 LLUIS CLARET New England Conservatory  December 17 AMIT PELED Tempest Trio, Peabody Conservatory of Music  

By | 2017-09-12T17:36:36+00:00 August 16th, 2017|Categories: News, Featured|

Conquering Coordination Through Broken-Rhythm Patterns — by Grigory Kalinovsky

Reposted from Strings Magazine. One of the most common problems encountered by string players in virtuoso pieces is the coordination between the bow strokes and the left-hand fingers in fast running-note passages (passages consisting of mostly the same note values), especially when the majority of notes are played with separate bows or with a few small slurs thrown in. Examples of these types of passages abound—they include sections from the Finale movement of Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto in D minor, several episodes and the entire coda section of Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso by Saint-Saens, the majority of the Allegro movement from Kreisler’s Preludium and Allegro, and many, many other pieces. Without proper coordination training, playing these passages can create a feeling of the two hands “chasing each other”—and getting tangled up [...]

By | 2017-07-19T02:48:55+00:00 June 14th, 2017|Categories: In the Practice Room, Self Discovery, CelloBlog, Featured|Tags: , , |

Beneath the Surface of Brahms — by Brant Taylor

Brahms' 3rd Symphony Cello Excerpt A successful audition performance involves showing many different sides of yourself, musically, in a condensed period of time. Therefore, it is useful if not imperative to conceive each excerpt on a list in its own distinct world of character and color. Despite being works from the same composer, the well-known cello audition excerpt from Brahms’ Second Symphony, which we previously discussed, and the cello audition excerpt from Brahms’ Third Symphony, which is the subject of this post, present quite different opportunities. While these suggestions are not the only solutions to the challenges presented by this excerpt, they are a starting point for practice and discussion and illustrate some of the details that must be carefully considered in any successful performance. Sound Production In thinking about [...]

Myth Busters — by Brant Taylor

Instrumentalists often prepare for an orchestra audition by seeking feedback on their preparation from a teacher or colleague.  Perhaps because my career includes both orchestral playing and teaching, I am frequently asked to coach players who are preparing solo work(s) and orchestral excerpts for a given audition.  Some players I hear are very new to the audition game, while others are already seasoned professionals looking to step up to another ensemble or for a promotion in their current group.  After years of talking with these musicians about auditions in general and about the specifics of their preparation, I've noticed several assumptions that players sometimes make about auditions.  While some of these assumptions are true, and made with good reason, many others are best described as myths. Some of these are half-truths, and [...]