Cello Travel

Top Cellist Steven Isserlis Prevented from Boarding Flight with Cello

Reposted from Classic FM. A nightmare mix-up at the check-in desk meant that Steven Isserlis (and his cello) completely missed his flight—the last one that day… Last night, British cellist Steven Isserlis joined the growing list of cellists and other instrumentalists who have had problems checking in their instruments onto flights:   Isserlis shared the whole nightmare story on his Facebook page, from the first heart-sinking moments of doubt "Have you paid for the cello seat?" to the dash across Heathrow to catch an alternative flight to a different city entirely. Here's the story in all its painful detail [retrieved from Mr. Isserlis' Facebook page]: "My latest adventure - courtesy of KLM... Now, I’d been planning to present another musical rant in the near future, and was already vaguely planning it [...]

By |2017-09-15T02:09:24+00:00July 19th, 2017|Categories: News, Cello Travel|Tags: , , , |

Travels with Ima – by Robert Jesselson

This year my cello is celebrating its 300th birthday. Made in 1716 by Jacques Boquay, I call her Ima, as in “I’m a Cello” because whenever I fly with her I book the ticket as Ima Cello. That way I collect the frequent flyer miles and get a free meal! When I was younger it was a lot easier to travel with a cello—in fact when I lived in Germany, I used to fly with Swiss Air and they usually just let me take Ima on the plane without paying for a seat. Later I bought a big Kolstein travel case—it is huge and bulky, but it has an inflatable “balloon” that surrounds the cello inside the case and is made out of Kevlar so you can shoot a gun at it and it won’t pierce the [...]

By |2018-08-05T06:32:03+00:00March 9th, 2017|Categories: Luthiers|Tags: , , , |

Curtis on Tour is Stalled by Airline Refusal To Take Cello

Reprinted from Slipped Disc May 21, 2016 Students from the Curtis Institute were boarding a plane at Philadelphia this weekend at the start of a tour of Spain when a Lufthansa official refused to take a cello on board. The cellist, Zach, had to take another plane – American Airlines, no problem with cello – but he could only get a flight to London and spent many hours trying to connect up with the others in Valencia. The first Curtis on Tour performance is May 18 in Alicante. Curtis have confirmed that ‘there were indeed difficulties with a cello’ and are looking into the incident. Lufthansa have offered no excuses, yet.           UPDATE: Apparently, at Philadelphia airport, Lufthansa staff gave a variety of reasons why the cello [...]

By |2017-10-30T04:41:21+00:00May 21st, 2016|Categories: Cello Travel|Tags: , , |

Famed Cellist Angry That Canadian Airline’s Policy Banning Cellos from Cabin Still Unchanged

[Blogmaster’s note: If you are upset after reading this story and want to add your voice, please go to change.org and sign the petition!] Paul Katz says he is ‘outraged’ after WestJet refused a cello in the cabin during a flight from Vancouver, four years after he received the same treatment. Reprinted from the Vancouver Metro, January 28, 2016 By Thandi Fletcher A renowned American cellist says he is “outraged” after hearing that WestJet refused to allow a young musician’s cello in the cabin during a recent flight from Vancouver, even though he bought an extra seat for the instrument. Nearly four years ago, Paul Katz says he received the same treatment. “I get angry,” he told Metro. “I just think WestJet is so indefensible, and their attitude is so cavalier. They’re just [...]

By |2017-10-30T04:43:49+00:00January 28th, 2016|Categories: Cello Travel|Tags: , , , , , , |

This Looks Like Another Viola Joke, but it’s Not a Joke! Air Canada’s Outrageous New Policy

Reposted from The Violin Channel Air Canada has today published a detailed explanation of its musical instrument transportation policy—declaring violins and cellos are permitted to be taken within the cabin, but violas must be transported within the hold. “Violins may be accepted as carry-on or checked baggage,” the online Air Canada policy statement has outlined—however “Violas can only be accepted as checked baggage.” “A cello may be accepted as checked baggage, or may be transported in the cabin if a seat is purchased for it,” the statement reads. The new policy differs from most international airline carriers—who make no distinction in the rules between violins and violas. The policy announcement comes just months after virtuoso Itzhak Perlman filed a formal complaint against the airline—after he was abandoned by an Air Canada disability assistant at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport. Below are excerpts [...]

A String Player’s Guide to the Ivory Ban

If you plan to travel abroad this summer, you may need a passport… for your bow. Horror stories have been circulating about the confiscation of string players’ bows at international borders due to the recent “ivory ban.” On Saturday, May 31st, seven bows belonging to members of the Budapest Festival Orchestra were seized at JFK Airport (these did not have proper documentation, and have since been released). More alarming – a bow owned by a double-bassist in the Bavarian Radio Orchestra has been held at JFK since the orchestra passed through in mid-May, as it was found to contain a piece of bone from […]

Tour Musings — by Alisa Weilerstein

I'm now a few days removed from one of the most exhilarating—and definitely the longest—tours of my life.  I've grown accustomed to playing a different concerto every week, sometimes with a recital thrown in here and there.  But I can't remember the last time I actually played only one piece for three weeks straight.  However, that's exactly what I did in the last week of March and first two weeks of April; I played Shostakovich 1st Concerto fifteen times across the US with the St Petersburg Philharmonic and Yuri Temirkanov. I've had so many thoughts about this tour and am struggling to consolidate them into a coherent blog entry.  I have to start by saying what an incredible musical and educational experience it was for me.  There are players in [...]